How to make the perfect omelette

I love omelettes!  They are delicious, healthy and the perfect way to use up random veggies, meat and cheese that you might have lingering in your fridge.  You can eat them for breakfast, lunch or dinner.  I learned how to make a perfect one from Jamie Oliver, although I must confess that mine are not as beautiful as his.

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Organic Omelette

Omelettes are one of my new favorite things to make and they’re actually very easy.  Here’s how I did it:

From the organic organic omelettebox: eggs, green onion, tomato

From the regular store: cheddar cheese, salt, oil

From Iherb: fresh ground pepper

Beat up a couple eggs with salt and pepper.  Pour into a well-oiled or buttered pan.  Spread around so it covers the pan evenly.  Gently pull back the cooked egg to allow the liquid to go underneath.  It’s done when it’s almost cooked, but not quite.  You want it a bit liquidy because it’s way more delicious that way.

Then add your toppings into the middle.  Pre-cook anything like peppers, white onions, bacon, etc.  Fold over carefully.  Then, I added some fresh tomatoes to this one.  Enjoy!

 

6 Foods to Avoid Adding to your Smoothie

I’m a huge fan of Green Smoothies and eat them probably 14/15 days for breakfast.  I ran across this excellent article the other day about 6 foods to avoid adding to smoothies and I wholeheartedly agree with its advice.

The article mentions that dried greens are not terrible, but fresh ones are better.  I usually depend on my organic box for greens, but some weeks are a little light and I run out towards the end of the week.  If it is, this is my go-to dried green powder, which I order on Iherb: Greens Plus Organic Superfood.

Water Parsley Quinoa Salad

Water parsley Quinoa SaladIn the organic box, they often include water parsley, which I find a little bit hard to put into my usual dishes and it’s peppery so not an ideal addition to green smoothies.  So, I branched out and came up with a new creation.

From the organic box/regular supermarket:

Water parsley, zucchini, onion, garlic

From Iherb:

Quinoa, parsley, celery salt, veggie stock cube, fresh-ground pepper

Here’s how to do it:

Cook the quinoa according to the package directions.  I added a veggie stock cube.  Then fry up your veggies in a bit of oil, adding the greens and spices right at the end.  Mix the veggies up with the quinoa and enjoy!  It’s equally good hot or cold.

 

Water Parsley Side-Dish

In the organic CSA box, they often send water parsley.  The problem is that most expats in Korea truly have no idea what to do with it.  How I usually eat it up is by making a really simple salad.Water Parsley Salad  Here’s how you do it:

Clean and chop up the water parsley.  I usually use some of the stems, but discard the really thick pieces.

Then, from the regular supermarket or Iherb, add:

Sesame oil, ground up red pepper, sesame oil, salt, brown rice vinegar, garlic.

You should add sesame seeds and green onions, but I didn’t have any.

Eat it with some rice!

Bibimbap, “Fusion-Style”

I like “fusion” to describe anything that is not quite authentic, even if it doesn’t really “fuse” elements from another culture.  Anyway, here is how I made my not so authentic Bibimbap:

From the regular mart: 

Rice, gochujang (spicy red paste)

From the Organic Box:

Egg, lettuce, bean sprouts, eggplant, water parsley

After getting the organic box of goodness, I made up three Korean sidedishes: eggplant, bean sprout, and water parsley. I looked up a few recipes online to get an idea of the basic ingredients and then just taste-tested along the way until I liked it.

To make up the Bibimbap, I added some cooked rice, chopped up lettuce, the three  vegetable side-dishes, some gochujang (red pepper-paste) and an over-easy egg.  Then, I mixed it all up with my chopsticks and enjoyed!  This picture is of the pre-mixed up state.bibimbap

 

 

Whole Wheat Pancakes with Mango

Mango Pancakes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An interesting new development in the  world of foreign food in Korea is the wide availability of fresh mangoes.  In previous years, you could get them at the big supermarkets, but they’d be ridiculously expensive (like $5 each).

In this case, my friend gave me a few for my birthday.  Perhaps one of the best presents I’ve ever gotten?  Anyway, here’s how I made them:

From the organic box/regular supermarket/street fruit truck:

milk/ eggs/ fresh mango/ oil

From Iherb:

Whole Wheat Buttermilk Pancake Mix, Cinnamon, Vanilla extract, Organic Maple Syrup

Just follow the directions on the box and you have your pancakes in 10 minutes or less!  I always make an extra one to eat for a snack at work the next day.  You can also freeze them and pop them in the toaster for a quick breakfast on the go.