Baked tortilla chips for your hummus

You’re perhaps wondering what you can use to scoop up that delicious homemade hummus of yours.  A good option is homemade brown bread, but if that’s too much work for you, there’s an even easier solution: baked tortilla chips.

It’s really quite simple.  Just go to Costco and get the jumbo bag of tortillas (or you can buy them at the local mart as well usually, but they’re quite expensive).   Then, cut them up into triangles and lightly brush them with olive oil.  Add some salt, or another spice or two if you’re feeling adventurous.  Something like cumin is good for hummus.  Then bake in the oven on medium heat until crisp.  Check frequently because it’s quite easy to burn them.  You can store them for a few days in an airtight container, but make sure you let them cool first.

(image from Whatthecraft)

tortilla chips

Homemade Hummus

Hummus is one of the ultimate quick lunch or dinners for summer.  It’s cool and refreshing and surprisingly easy to make your own.  Here’s how you do it:

From Iherb: chickpeas, cumin, tahini paste

From the regular supermarket: salt, olive oil, fresh garlic, lemon juice (freshly squeezed is best).

Soak the chickpeas overnight and then bring to a boil.  Cover and let cool.  They should be cooked, but if not, bring to a boil one more time.

Then, mix up everything in the blender, going easy on the spices until you do your first taste test. Adjust ingredients to taste.

Serve with bread, crackers or fresh veggies like cucumber and carrots.

Tips:

1. If it’s difficult to blend, add some more olive oil or lemon juice.  DO NOT under any circumstance add milk or any other such crazy thing.

2. You need to add LOTS of lemon juice and salt.  This is how to make it extra delicious.

3. Make sure your chickpeas are cooked well so it’s smooth.

4. You can keep it in the fridge for 4 or 5 days.  I wouldn’t freeze it though.

5. People love homemade hummus but it’s hard to get in Korea.  You’ll be the most popular girl or boy at the party if you bring some.

 

 

Salt and Vinegar Chips

Did you know that the fabulous Iherb has some delicious junk-foody things that are very hard to find in South Korea?  Yes, it’s not all about the health stuff on Iherb.  Some of my personal favorites include:

Salt and Vinegar Chips, Organic Coffee,  Bacon Ranch Dressing,  Organic Chocolate, and organic Jelly Beans.  Yes, it’s not home-cooking in Korea, but it is a lot of deliciousness!

Salt and Vinegar Chips

Organic Omelette

Omelettes are one of my new favorite things to make and they’re actually very easy.  Here’s how I did it:

From the organic organic omelettebox: eggs, green onion, tomato

From the regular store: cheddar cheese, salt, oil

From Iherb: fresh ground pepper

Beat up a couple eggs with salt and pepper.  Pour into a well-oiled or buttered pan.  Spread around so it covers the pan evenly.  Gently pull back the cooked egg to allow the liquid to go underneath.  It’s done when it’s almost cooked, but not quite.  You want it a bit liquidy because it’s way more delicious that way.

Then add your toppings into the middle.  Pre-cook anything like peppers, white onions, bacon, etc.  Fold over carefully.  Then, I added some fresh tomatoes to this one.  Enjoy!

 

Whole Wheat Pancakes with Mango

Mango Pancakes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An interesting new development in the  world of foreign food in Korea is the wide availability of fresh mangoes.  In previous years, you could get them at the big supermarkets, but they’d be ridiculously expensive (like $5 each).

In this case, my friend gave me a few for my birthday.  Perhaps one of the best presents I’ve ever gotten?  Anyway, here’s how I made them:

From the organic box/regular supermarket/street fruit truck:

milk/ eggs/ fresh mango/ oil

From Iherb:

Whole Wheat Buttermilk Pancake Mix, Cinnamon, Vanilla extract, Organic Maple Syrup

Just follow the directions on the box and you have your pancakes in 10 minutes or less!  I always make an extra one to eat for a snack at work the next day.  You can also freeze them and pop them in the toaster for a quick breakfast on the go.

 

Welcome to Home Cooking in Korea

It really is easy to cook delicious meals at home in Korea, even Western style ones if you know where to look for ingredients.  It ends up being much cheaper and healthier than eating out all the time.  My secrets are:

1. Gmarket– anything and everything can be found here, including convection ovens.

2. Iherb– this is the site for all things healthy, and vegan or vegetarian in Korea.  Plus, you can find a few hard to find treats like organic chocolate or Salt & Vinegar chips.

3. Costco–  This should be your go to source for meat, cheese, wine and processed Western food.  And, they have outrageously delicious food in their food-court.

4. Wwoof Csa– Who doesn’t love organic food delivered straight to your door?  I sure do.  It comes once/week and contains all the vegetables and eggs that I need for the week.  Healthy eating at a good price.

Follow the blog for recipes, meal ideas and fabulous ingredients finds.