Korean Eggplant Sidedish

In the organic box this week, I got some eggplant.  Since I was too lazy to make Baba Ghanoush, the most delicious eggplant thing ever, I settled for Korean eggplant side-dish.  It was my first attempt at making it and it turned out okay, but not as good as I’ve had in restaurants.korean eggplant sidedish  I loosely followed this recipe online:

Korean Eggplant Sidedish

All the ingredients are easily found at the regular Korean supermarket.  Serve with rice and some fried tofu for a delicious meal.

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Water Parsley Side-Dish

In the organic CSA box, they often send water parsley.  The problem is that most expats in Korea truly have no idea what to do with it.  How I usually eat it up is by making a really simple salad.Water Parsley Salad  Here’s how you do it:

Clean and chop up the water parsley.  I usually use some of the stems, but discard the really thick pieces.

Then, from the regular supermarket or Iherb, add:

Sesame oil, ground up red pepper, sesame oil, salt, brown rice vinegar, garlic.

You should add sesame seeds and green onions, but I didn’t have any.

Eat it with some rice!

Bibimbap, “Fusion-Style”

I like “fusion” to describe anything that is not quite authentic, even if it doesn’t really “fuse” elements from another culture.  Anyway, here is how I made my not so authentic Bibimbap:

From the regular mart: 

Rice, gochujang (spicy red paste)

From the Organic Box:

Egg, lettuce, bean sprouts, eggplant, water parsley

After getting the organic box of goodness, I made up three Korean sidedishes: eggplant, bean sprout, and water parsley. I looked up a few recipes online to get an idea of the basic ingredients and then just taste-tested along the way until I liked it.

To make up the Bibimbap, I added some cooked rice, chopped up lettuce, the three  vegetable side-dishes, some gochujang (red pepper-paste) and an over-easy egg.  Then, I mixed it all up with my chopsticks and enjoyed!  This picture is of the pre-mixed up state.bibimbap

 

 

Whole Wheat Pancakes with Mango

Mango Pancakes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An interesting new development in the  world of foreign food in Korea is the wide availability of fresh mangoes.  In previous years, you could get them at the big supermarkets, but they’d be ridiculously expensive (like $5 each).

In this case, my friend gave me a few for my birthday.  Perhaps one of the best presents I’ve ever gotten?  Anyway, here’s how I made them:

From the organic box/regular supermarket/street fruit truck:

milk/ eggs/ fresh mango/ oil

From Iherb:

Whole Wheat Buttermilk Pancake Mix, Cinnamon, Vanilla extract, Organic Maple Syrup

Just follow the directions on the box and you have your pancakes in 10 minutes or less!  I always make an extra one to eat for a snack at work the next day.  You can also freeze them and pop them in the toaster for a quick breakfast on the go.

 

Green Smoothie (or, how to use Mallow)

The organic box from Wwoof CSA seems to love including “mallow,” which is a traditional Korean green that is used in Dwenjang Chigae  (fermented soybean soup) usually.  But, for me who rarely cooks up a chigae at home, it’s not so easy to use.  However, I’ve discovered a fabulous new application that I’m reasonably sure no Korean has ever tried: Green Smoothie!  Mallow has basically a neutral flavor, so it’s kind of perfect.  I’ve been putting 1/2 of the big bag in a single smoothie and have no ill-effects to report in stomach pain, or taste.  Here are the ingredient’s from today’s smoothie:

From the organic box/ regular supermarket: Mallow/ Banana/ Cucumber/ Strawberries/ Blueberries (for best results, make sure they’re all frozen).

From Iherb: Almond Milk, Pumpkin Seeds, Oatmeal.

The best way to use Mallow

The best way to use Mallow

Chickpea Curry

photoThis is a simple, healthy and delicious curry that you can make in about 10 minutes.  Here are the ingredients:

Iherb: Chickpeas, cumin, coriander, cinnamon, curry powder, salt.

Organic box, or regular mart: garlic, onion, ginger, zucchini, tomatoe

Soak the chickpeas overnight and then boil until soft.  Set aside.  Fry up onion/garlic/ginger.  Add the spices.  Then add zucchini and tomato.  Fry until soft and add chickpeas and a bit of water if it’s dry.  You could also add some coconut milk if you like it more creamy and something like pineapple or raisins if you like a bit of sweetness, or cashews if you want a bit of crunch.

Serve over rice, with some plain yogurt, green onion or cilantro on top.

Organic Omelete

This week in the organic box, I got a few things that were perfect to make an omelet with.  It’s really easy and takes about 10 minutes.

Fry up some: onion/ green pepper/zucchini/ mushrooms.  Season with some salt/pepper/garlic powder or real garlic.  Set aside.

Beat some eggs with salt/pepper/basil.  Of course, get all your spices from Iherb! (they have free shipping until the end of April).

Then pour the eggs out into a well-oiled pan over low-heat.  Use your lifter to move the uncooked egg to the bottom of the pan.  When it’s almost cooked, put your vegetables on top and fold over carefully.

Add some fresh tomatoes on top.  Delicious!

organic omelette

organic omelette